Tuesday, July 10, 2007

BIG SAVINGS ON OUR ELECTRIC BILLS by WALT BARRETT



Can you imagine saving up to $41.00 a year just by changing a single light bulb? Well believe me, it’s entirely possible. We have five flood lamps on a dimmer switch in our new home, and they were chewing up some serious electricity. We have been switch out the old style light bulbs and this weekend it was the kitchen’s turn. We had to make a trip to the Home Depot anyway because we needed the waterproof wire, the wire connectors, and the marine sealer for our solar water pump installation movie we are about to shoot and post on the Internet. While we were in the electrical department we also picked up six the new energy saving kitchen flood lamps. They are packed two to a package and a bargain at $9.95 a twin pack. Each lamp only requires 14 Watts of input power to output 65 Watts of nice soft white light. Each lamp will save you $41.00 a year on your electric bill, and to further the bargain they will last 4 times longer than a standard lamp! This is a huge savings of not only money, but of electricity and carbon emissions. As far as I’m concerned they can stop making the old fashioned light bulbs today. Now, even if you have so much money that it’s falling out of your pockets, and you could care less about your electric bill, you should still do the responsible thing and switch over to the new lams just to cut sown on the national energy use and carbon foot print, even if you think that the whole global warming thing is junk science. Switching over to energy saving lams is the cheapest insurance policy on the future that you could ever buy, and you save a lot of money in the bargain. Let’s say that you save $500.00 in one year, look at the gasoline or fuel oil that will buy!
I think it’s time we got a lot more serious about saving energy!
As a public service to our readers we have posted a totally free classified advertising web site on the Internet.
It is
www.free2advertize.com Please us it as often as you like and please tell your friends about us.
That’s advertize with a Z.
Walt Barrett President
A to Z Global Marketing Inc.

Monday, June 25, 2007

THE COST OF BUILDING A MICRO HOME BY WALT BARRETT

I have noticed that several people have commented about the high cost of the micro homes, and I would like to comment that as an experiment we have been gathering used, and surplus materials for free. We find that in our area there are literally container loads of practically new sheets of plywood, and many other types of construction materials going to the landfills on a daily basis. Also, there are many people, and contractors trying to get rid of used tempered glass sliding doors and windows that will go to the landfills. These used glass units can be separated with a razor knife if they are filled with moisture and used as single glazed windows or non sealed double glazed units simply by making new wooden frames for them. If you are poor with no home you can't be splitting hairs about single or double glazing, especially in a mild or warm climate. It all depends on your budget.
My calculations indicate that a 16' long X 8' high x 10' wide exterior shell can be built for practically zero dollars using these recycled materials. The worst-case scenario is that you might have to spend $300.00 for additional materials to build an empty shell. The recycled sliding glass doors will save a fortune in siding etc by turning them into solid walls. That leaves a great deal of money for someone to do a custom interior design for his or her own particular requirements.
Another thing that bothers me about the published costs of these tiny homes is that you can purchase a deluxe larger size aluminum camping trailer for two thirds ($37,000.00) or less of the published cost of many of these homes at $50,000.00 or higher. There is even one camping trailer advertised in Germany for only $6000.00 and two people can easily live in it. What makes a micro home cost, in this case, nearly ten times the cost of a metal camping trailer that is even larger? Personally, I think a little more research into the costs is needed by the consumers. These tiny homes can be mass produced on a low dollar basis, and a business can still make a fair profit doing it.
We also need more research into newer materials that have hit the market recently. There is a honeycomb material that is currently being used in the construction of truck cargo compartment bodies. It will give you an exterior and interior wall all in one unit. The only sacrifice is that the wiring would have to be exterior mounted on the walls and ceilings. There are several attractive products for that purpose on the market now. Low voltage LED lighting can also be used for a great savings in power.
Of course, the problem of land costs remains the greatest problem in our area. We have to get a handle on that. I believe that eventually the powers that be will have to make changes in how the available space in neighborhoods will be used to relieve the pressure in the housing market.